Passing the mantle: a parting farewell

Adobe SparkThis issue of the Journal of Paramedic Practice will be my last as editor. It has been an honour and privilege to edit a publication aimed at one of the most exciting healthcare professions, and I am grateful for being given this fantastic opportunity. I took over the journal in 2013, having previously worked on a nursing title, and in those few short years have witnessed a notable change within the paramedic profession.

The publication of the Francis report marked the beginning of my time as editor, and although not directly concerned with paramedics, it highlighted a need for cultural change within the NHS, with an emphasis on patient-focused care. This was followed by the long overdue update to the UK Ambulance Services Clinical Practice Guidelines, which was welcomed by the profession. The latest update was published earlier this year.

The publication of the end of study report for the Paramedic Evidence Based Project (PEEP), which called for the introduction of a national education and training framework for paramedics, marked a turning point for the profession and highlighted how its needs were changing. This was cemented in Sir Bruce Keogh’s Urgent and Emergency Care Review, which called for the development of 999 ambulance services so that they become mobile urgent treatment services. Illustrating an appreciation of the skill set of paramedics, their potential in the delivery of pre-hospital care was finally being recognised.

The Five Year Forward View expanded on these ideas and proposed a broadened role for ambulance services. It was becoming apparent that out-of-hospital care was becoming an increasingly important part of the work the NHS undertakes.

One of the most significant changes within the profession over the last few years has been the growth of its professional body. As of January 2016 there were 6 458 full members of the College of Paramedics. This represents 29.7% of all paramedic registrants of the Health and Care Professions Council, the regulatory body for the paramedic profession. The increase in members show the College is one step closer to its aim of becoming a Royal College, which requires that 50% of the profession are members of the professional body.

However, this evolution has not been without its difficulties. Reports of staff facing burnout, time taken off work due to stress-related illnesses, problems with staff retention, disputes over pay, and the fundamental problem of how ambulance services can cope with year-on-year increases in demand, mean the workforce is facing all manner of pressures.

Despite this, I believe these are exciting times for paramedics. As we gradually see a move to an all-graduate profession and changes to the paramedic scope of practice, the opportunities for work outside of the ambulance service are growing.

As I pass the mantle, I look forward to seeing the journal reach new heights following my departure under a new editor. It only remains for me to personally thank my consultant editors, the editorial board, and of course, you the readers, who have ensured the publication could continue.

Taken from Journal of Paramedic Practice, published 5 August 2016.